Friday, December 5, 2008

English 101 Day 49

H/I Cover Letter
H/I Final, Final Draft
Return of Essays, etc
First week of Winter Quarter.
Grades mostly.
For more feedback from me, bring your essay in and we’ll go over it.

Grades due Next Friday, posted online under schedule that day

6. My schedule: Winter 102 x3 in the evening; Spring English 070 x2 and creative writing.

Also, you can ask about anything anytime.
You can say hi to me on campus. Say your name and I’ll say mine.
You can say hi to each other.

From my English 102 class: Andy Blevins' story.

One in there Americans in their mid-twenties attended but did not finish college.

Only 41 percent of low-income students entering a four year college managed to graduate within five years. (66% of high income did).

75 percent of students enrolling in community colleges said they hoped to transfer to a four year institution. But only 17 percent of those made the switch within five year. The rest were out working or still studying toward the two year degree.

Your story has to be different.

Now you can do this.

Tuesday, December 2, 2008

Business Letter format

business letter example here, formatting here;

Monday, December 1, 2008

Day 45

Lesson Plan Day 45 English 101 Fall 08

  1. Essays Returned. Much lower scores overall.
    1. Biggest Issue
      1. Evidence, Evidence, Evidence
        1. Like you typed up your in class essay and called it good.
          1. What were you doing?
        2. Dig, quote, cite.
          1. This is the ditch digging and the money maker.
      2. Thesis statements and topic sentences.
    2. Best essays
  2. Grades calculated by tomorrow.
  1. MLA Death Match 2008—Round One

Bonus Points: Prism submissions for Narratives—pick either adult or child's version.

The Final Week—Specials Guest Leon Lett, Lindsey Jacobellis, and the Tour De Dumb.

  1. Tuesday: Work in lab on either revision, cover letter or portfolio worksheet. Revision tips.
  2. Wednesday: Peer Editing, Bring two copies of Final, Final. Portfolio Revision Worksheet Due
  3. Thursday: MLA DeathMatch 2007, Round Two.
  4. Friday: Final, Final Essays Due; A Cover Letter About Your Writing Due; Evaluation of my teaching in class.

Wednesday, November 26, 2008

Day 44

Lesson Plan Day 44 English 101 Fall 08

  1. H/I Final Draft of ICB essay.
  2. O/R-- Plate of Peas. Y/N?
  3. Bonus Points: Prism submissions for Narratives—pick either adult or child's version.
  4. Revision tips.

    1. Link to Dartmouth here.

The Final Week—Specials Guest Leon Lett, Lindsey Jacobellis, and the Tour De Dumb.

  1. Monday: MLA DeathMatch 2008, Round One.
  2. Tuesday: Work in lab on either revision, cover letter or portfolio worksheet. Revision tips.
  3. Wednesday: Peer Editing, Bring two copies of Final, Final. Portfolio Revision Worksheet Due
  4. Thursday: MLA DeathMatch 2008, Round Two.
  5. Friday: Final, Final Essays Due; A cover letter about your writing due; Evaluation of my teaching in class.

Tuesday, November 25, 2008

Using Kim in the Essay

Works Cited for Lydia Kim's Essay


 

Lydia Kim, Critical Essay on In Cold Blood, in Nonfiction Classics for Students, The Gale Group, 2001.


 

In text, just use Kim in signal phrase, or in parenthesis (skip the page numbers for now):

According to Kim, "Capote's sympathies for Smith are obvious."


 

Or


 

We can clearly see, "Capote's sympathies for Smith are obvious" (Kim).

In text citation Film

http://lib.trinity.edu/research/citing/nontrad.shtml#SoundRecording

No Country for Old Men Study Guide

http://www.lee.edu/~jhamby/pdf/huma/NoCountry.pdf

pdf, so it opens slowly, but it's helpful for #5's.

Day 43

Lesson Plan Day 43 English 101 Fall 08

1. Rubric for Essay 4.

2. Scratch outline.

3. MLA works cited and in text for ICB and Capote and web sources.

4. No Country: Coin Flip, Ed Tom and Roscoe, Ending.

5. Volunteers?

6. Bonus Points: Prism submissions for Narratives—pick either adult or child's version.

The Final Week—Specials Guest Leon Lett, Lindsey Jacobellis, and the Tour De Dumb.

  1. Monday: MLA DeathMatch 2007, Round One.
  2. Tuesday: Work in lab on either revision, cover letter or portfolio worksheet. Revision tips.
  3. Wednesday: Peer Editing, Bring two copies of Final, Final. Portfolio Revision Worksheet Due
  4. Thursday: MLA DeathMatch 2007, Round Two.
  5. Friday: Final, Final Essays Due; A Cover Letter About Your Writing Due; Evaluation of my teaching in class.

No Country Ending

No Country Coin Flip

Thursday, November 20, 2008

FYI

Washington State, the economy
and you.

Monday, November 17, 2008

NCfOM Screenplay

Here's the screenplay.

NCfOM



The voice over up to about 3 minutes in, "Ok. I'll be part of this world."

Day 40

Fall 08 English 101 Day 40


 

  1. Essay 4 outlines
  2. Essay 4 in groups
    1. Collect and share evidence to support your points
  3. No Country first 10 minutes

Rough Drafts Due Thursday, bring 4 copies

Essay 4

Essay 4: In Cold Blood

3-5 pages

100 pts

Rough 11/ 20     

Final 11/25


 

  1. How does Capote change the story? How does the story change Capote? Use ICB and Capote to make your points.


 

  1. Which of the following reasons (from Kim's essay) best explains why the Clutters were murdered? Using examples from ICB, explore all four (3?) reasons in the process of explaining why one is best explains the crime.


     

    1. an ill-fated crossing of paths,
    2. a psychological accident, (what does this one mean?)
    3. mental illness, or
    4. displaced revenge?


     

  2. How and why would you vote on the jury? Guilty/Innocent? Sane/Insane? Death/Life? Use examples from ICB to support your point. Also, I've got a packet on the Death penalty pro/con.
    1. Should there be a death penalty in America?
    2. If so, does this case fit the criteria for a death sentence?
    3. Should both men be put to death?


 


 


 


 


 


 

  1. According to Kim:

    The book is ultimately a condemnation of society's treatment of its children and its unwillingness to forgive those outside the boundaries of acceptable definition. Capote's portrayal of Smith as the victim of a self-righteous society reveals his own rejection of conformity and his identification with the antagonist anti-hero. Smith's primary fault, Capote believes, is not being a criminal, but attempting to change the path set by childhood trauma and familial abuse and defy the characterization of himself by others. If Smith is not mentally ill, Capote believes that he has dormant violent tendencies, like everyone, which were fed a steady diet by a history of humiliating experiences—until he explodes in a misdirected, fatal fury.

    1. Summarize this statement point by point in your own words. These could be body paragraphs. (There's four sentences in Kim's statement).
    2. Respond to each point with your own opinion (agree/disagree, agree and disagree? agree with changes, disagree with most but not all etc.)
    3. Use examples from ICB and Capote to support your agreement or disagreement.
  2. PLEASE, PLEASE only write about this if you are up to a big challenge.

The idea behind the texts I chose for this class was to move from Maycomb to Holcomb to No Country. And from small town 30's, 50's, 80's. And to see the country change, maybe to see it's values decline. To go from Atticus to Anarchy. Compare/contrast these three pictures of the shifting values in America. What has changed? What is the same?

  1. Have we become No Country for Atticus/Dewey/Ed Tom?
  2. In so doing have we become a country for the Ewells? Perry Smith? Anton Chigurh?
  3. or a country for Tom Robinson, Calpurnia, Capote and Scout?

Use Lydia Kim. Use NCFoM articles. Use ideas of "postmodernism". Crime? Racism? Gender equality? Violence (including pop culture, war, children, etc)?

Wednesday, November 12, 2008

Day 36

Fall 08 English 101 Day 36


 

  1. How to Score these essays?
  2. O/R Y/N?
    1. Y=+5; N=+/- 0
    2. Y= adult or child

Read Essay 4 options if time

Monday, November 10, 2008

Day 35

Fall 08 English 101 Day 35

Don't forget: Kevin Miller 6pm Writing Center Wednesday (10 bp or +2abs) and Mark Fuzie 7pm Allied Arts Wednesday (5bp or +1abs). Do both and get fat on points BEFORE Thanksgiving.

  1. Setting (time and place)
  2. Characterization (the sort of person who…)
  3. Grading

    1. Practice essays
  4. Essays Options: Expand one of your in class essays on ICB (Such as pro/con death penalty, New Journalism, something from Kim's essay, looking closely at the four "causes" of the murder)

    1. Rough Draft Due November 20th.
    2. Final Draft Due November 24th.

    Dialogue:

    1. Listen to how people talk to each other

      1. Most of it is the weather.
      2. He's like a bull in a china shop…
      3. Eating out.
      4. Waiting in line.
      5. At the checkout.
    2. Dialogue is not real speech, but it should sound like it.

      1. Cut words and phrases that don't move things along
    3. Don't use dialogue provide exposition—keep it to three sentences or less
    4. Break it up with action—remind us they are physical

    5. Vary signal phrases, but keep it simple. Don't use elaborate signal phrases (she expostulated, he interjected)

    1. Avoid stereotypes in dialect, but…

      1. Huck Finn
      2. Carver's What We Talk About
    2. Don't over use slang/profanity. "Slang goes sour in a short time." --EH
    3. Read a lot. Note good/bad
    4. Punctuate correctly

      1. Use quotation marks?
      2. Start a new paragraph when changing speakers.

Friday, November 7, 2008

In Cold Blood Trailer

Infamous Trailer

Day 34

Fall 08 English 101 Day 34


 

  1. Bonus Points Next Week: Kevin Miller 6pm Glenn Anthon Writing Center (10 BP or +2 abs), and Mark Fuzie 7pm Allied Arts (+5BP or +1 Abs)
  2. Complete Peer Review
  3. Peer Review Review
  4. Intro and Conclusions and outline
  5. Grading
  6. ICB
    1. Hickock
      1. Guilty?
      2. Sane?
      3. Death?
    2. Smith
      1. Guilty?
      2. Sane?
      3. Death?
    3. The murders were
      1. an ill-fated crossing of paths,
      2. a psychological accident,
      3. mental illness, or
      4. displaced revenge?
    4. Maycomb v Holcomb as "Small Town Values"
      1. What's the same?
      2. What's changed?
      3. What caused the crimes? What was the injustice?
    5. How does the story change him?
    6. How does he change the story?
    7. Movie v Book
    8. TKAM v ICB
  7. Option 1: Expand one of your in class essays on ICB (Such as pro/con death penalty, New Journalism, something from Kim's essay, looking closely at the four "causes" of the murder)
  8. Option 2: Wait for next week to look at "Small Town Values" and NCFOM?
    1. Rough Draft Due November 20th.

Final Draft Due November 24th.

Dialogue

Punctuating it.
Writing it.

Wednesday, November 5, 2008

Peer Review Questions

Essay 2 Peer Review Worksheet

Please complete this worksheet, then discuss with the writer


 

  1. What do you like best about this paper? What words, phrases, sentences, or paragraphs really stand out for you?


 

  1. Is the sequence or chronology of events clear? Are there places where you get confused? Did they skip anything?


 

  1. Are the descriptions of the people and the places clear and concrete?
    1. Where can the writer offer more or less description of the people and the places?
    2. What person is most clearly described?
    3. What place is most clearly described?


 

  1. Is there any dialogue? Too little? Too much? Where might the writer add dialogue?


 

  1. Do the descriptions provide an image (a picture, a sound, a smell, a taste, an atmosphere, an action)? Write down one or two examples of vivid imagery in the essay:


 

  1. What is the theme? What lesson do you take away?


 

  1. What evidence/details do they provide to support this theme?


 

Suggest a different title

Monday, November 3, 2008

Day 30

Fall 08 English 101 Day 30


 

  1. Vote
  2. Finish Capote.
  3. Essays back.
  4. Essay 3 Child/Adult rough draft due Wednesday. Bring 4 copies.

In class essay preview

In Class Essay Preview

ICB/Capote In Class Essay Preview

  1. How does Capote change the story? How does the story change Capote? (film, mainly)
  2. Using Lydia Kim's essay as a guide, compare/contrast the world of Maycomb 1930 to the world of Holcomb 1959.
    1. values?
    2. heroes?
    3. victims?
    4. Picture of America?
    5. Progress?
  3. Nature v. Nuture for Hickock and Smith.

How would you vote on the jury?

Friday, October 31, 2008

Day 29

Fall 08 English 101 Day 29


 

  1. Essays back Monday. With Doughnuts. Yep.


     

  2. Quiz: The Corner


 

  1. Essay 3 Topic
    1. The Child as Narrator. (min 550 words)
    2. The Reminiscent Narrator. (min 550 words)
    3. Rough Draft Due Wednesday November 5th.
    4. Final Draft Due Wednesday November 12th.
    5. We'll work on the ideas this week.


       

    6. Today 10 minutes on who/what/where/when/why/how (1130)
    7. Today 10 minutes on senses/imagery


       

  2. Capote
    1. What happens to Capote as he investigates and reports?
    2. What happens to the story?


     

  3. Homework: Rough Draft of Child/Adult story due Wednesday.
  4. There will be an in class short answer/essay exam over the book Next Tuesday (4th).

I'll give you a study guide/test preview Monday.

Thursday, October 30, 2008

Day 28

Fall 08 English 101 Day 28


 

  1. Mary Badham, Last Night.


     

  2. Essays back Monday. With Doughnuts. Yep.


     

  3. Essay 3 Topic
    1. The Child as Narrator. (min 550 words)
    2. The Reminiscent Narrator. (min 550 words)
    3. Rough Draft Due Wednesday November 5th.
    4. Final Draft Due Wednesday November 12th.
    5. We'll work on the ideas this week.


       

  4. The Writing Process Starts Now
    1. Today 10 minutes on who/what/where/when/why/how.
    2. Tomorrow 10 minutes on senses/imagery


       

  5. Capote
    1. What happens to Capote as he investigates and reports?
    2. What happens to the story?


     

  6. Homework: Read to end of book. Quiz Friday.
  7. There will be an in class short answer/essay exam over the book Next Tuesday (4th).

I'll give you a study guide/test preview Monday.

Wednesday, October 29, 2008

Day 27

Fall 08 English 101 Day 27


 

  1. BP Alert: Mary Badham, Tonight.

    1.  

  2. H/B essays 1130: Nico and Jackie's essays, for example.
  3. 930 by Friday or Monday. 830 by Monday.


     

  4. Essay 3 Topic
    1. The Child as Narrator. (550 words)
    2. The Reminiscent Narrator. (550 words)
    3. Rough Draft Due Wednesday November 5th.
    4. Final Draft Due Wednesday November 12th.
    5. We'll work on the ideas this week.


       

  5. The Writing Process Starts Now
    1. H/O on Child's Voice from Dodie Forrest's 101.


       

  6. Capote
    1. What happens to Capote as he investigates and reports?
    2. What happens to the story?


     

Homework: Read to 310, Quiz Tomorrow.

Tuesday, October 28, 2008

Day 26

Fall 08 English 101 Day 26


 

  1. BP Alert: Mary Badham, Tomorrow Night.

    1.  

  2. Sickness slowed the reading of the essays. I'm doing my best to get them back by Friday. 830's will be back later than that.\


     

  3. Quiz 3 ICB The Answer


 

  1. Essay 3 Topic
    1. The Child as Narrator. (550 words)
    2. The Reminiscent Narrator. (550 words)
    3. Rough Draft Due Wednesday November 5th.
    4. Final Draft Due Wednesday November 12th.
    5. We'll work on the ideas this week.


       

  2. Capote


     

Homework: Read to 279

Monday, October 27, 2008

Day 25

Fall 08 English 101 Day 25


 

  1. Miguel Gaitan and Joel Ramos
  2. Ashley Todd and Mayella
  3. Connection to TKAM
    1. Small Town Values?
    2. American Dream?
    3. Essay topics?
      1. Death Penalty
      2. Insanity Plea
      3. Nature v. Nuture v. Chaos
      4. Small Town Values/The Loss of Innocence/The Death of the Dream


         

  4. Capote in person.
  5. Capote in film.


     

Homework: Read to 248

Capote on A&E Biograph



and



and



and part four of four

Capote with Groucho Marx



This one's weird.

Capote explains

Ashley Todd, Mayella Ewell on Line 1

Yakima's In Cold Blood

Background on sentencing here and here.

Kids doing hard time story here.

Recent story here:

http://www.yakima-herald.com/stories/2008/10/23/notorious-killer-is-seeking-bail

Friday, October 24, 2008

Day 24

Fall 08 English 101 Day 24


 

  1. Quiz 2


     

  2. Connection to TKAM
    1. Small Town Values?
    2. American Dream?
    3. Essay topics?
      1. Death Penalty
      2. Nature v. Nuture v. Chaos
      3. Small Town Values/The Loss of Innocence/The Death of the Dream


         

  3. Characters
    1. Herbert Clutter
    2. Dick Hickock
    3. Perry Smith
    4. Nancy Clutter
    5. Kenyon Clutter
    6. Bonnie Clutter
    7. Alvin Dewey
    8. Bobby Rupp
  4. Perry Smith's life.

Homework: Read to 211

Thursday, October 23, 2008

Day 23

Fall 08 English 101 Day 23


 

  1. Essays back in about a week. Please don't ask until next Wed.
  2. There are several adaptations of the book. The earlier version is better than the TV version. Capote and Infamous are both good, too and we'll be watching pieces of them.
  3. What makes this book unique/unusual?
    1. Fiction v. NonFiction
    2. Capote's method
  4. What are the issues so far?
  5. What makes people bad? What makes people murders?
  6. Why pick this book?
  7. Last to See Them Alive, plot
  8. Characters
    1. Herbert Clutter
    2. Dick Hickock
    3. Perry Smith
    4. Nancy Clutter
    5. Kenyon Clutter
    6. Bonnie Clutter
    7. Alvin Dewey
    8. Bobby Rupp

Homework: Read to 148 (go to 155 if you can)

Tuesday, October 21, 2008

Day 21

Fall 08 English 101 Day 21


  1. Writing Center
  2. Quiz ICB "The Last To See Them Alive
  3. MLA Document Design
  4. MLA Works Cited
    1. With Word 2007 References Tab
  5. How should we grade this?
  6. Thesis on board if time.
  7. No reading homework.
  8. Bring 2 copies of your essay to class tomorrow.

ABSOLUTELY NO LATE WORK. ESSAY DUE AT THE BEGINNING OF THE PERIOD. Period.

Monday, October 20, 2008

Day 20

Fall 08 English 101 Day 20


 

  1. Peer Review, Review?
  2. Writing Center
  3. Schedule changes
    1. Essay Due Date
      1. Monday—End of book, help with evidence
      2. Tuesday— MLA document design, works cited page. Film/questions
      3. Wednesday, essays due.
    2. Reading schedule (Give with the big hand, take with the little hand).


 

  1. Thesis statements up on the board.
  2. What makes this a great book?
  3. Why do we require HS students to read this book?
  4. What are the weaknesses?
    1. Gender, Race, Justice?
  5. What's out of date?
  6. Should it still be required reading?
  7. H/W: Read ICB to page 89

Quiz tomorrow ICB The Last to See Them Alive

Friday, October 17, 2008

Internalized Oppression

Famous Black Doll/White Doll experiment--updated, sadly.

Day 19

Fall 08 English 101 Day 19


 

  1. BP?
  2. From Hacker on Peer Review
  3. H/O peer review from other class.
    1. Any go too far?
    2. How you were graded.
  4. H/I Peer Review for other class
  5. Complete Peer Review Process
    1. Peer Review, Review
  6. Schedule changes
    1. Essay Due Date
      1. Friday, Saturday, Sunday—draft 2, 3, 4?
      2. Monday—End of book, help with evidence
      3. Tuesday— MLA document design, works cited page. Film/questions
      4. Wednesday, essays due.
    2. Reading schedule (Give with the big hand, take with the little hand).
  7. What makes this a great book?
  8. Why do we require HS students to read this book?
  9. What are the weaknesses?
    1. Gender, Race, Justice?
  10. What's out of date?

Should it still be required reading?

Thursday, October 16, 2008

Day 18

Fall 08 English 101 Day 18


 

  1. BP?
  2. H/I Peer Review for other class
  3. Today: Peer Edit Continued—Same Groups
    1. Notes: Thick skin. Kind honesty.
    2. Then, choose the order of the essays.
      1. Continue reading the first paper aloud, marking it as you go.
    3. After reading, discuss questions asked by writer.
    4. Then, complete g-k for the first essay.
    5. Finally, go over your responses on the worksheet with the writer.
    6. Repeat three times.


 

Homework: Complete Third/Fourth peer review form for your group.

Complete Peer Review form for the other class. (10 pts).

Wednesday, October 15, 2008

Day 17

Fall 08 English 101 Day 17


 

  1. BP?
  2. Yesterday
  3. Today: Peer Edit
    1. Notes: Thick skin. Kind honesty.
    2. Hand in one copy.
    3. Groups of 4 according to topic
    4. Number paragraphs
    5. Write 1-3 questions
    6. Exchange essays
      1. apologize
    7. Someone else reads your intro aloud, twice.
      1. Answer questions d-f.
    8. Then, choose the order of the essays.
      1. Continue reading the first paper aloud, marking it as you go.
    9. After reading, discuss questions asked by writer.
    10. Then, complete g-k for the first essay.
    11. Finally, go over your responses on the worksheet with the writer.
    12. Repeat three times.


 

Homework: Complete first peer review form for your group.

Complete Peer Review form for the other class. (10 pts).

Guidelines for using reviewers’ comments

Guidelines for using reviewers' comments


Don't take criticism personally.

Your reader is responding to your essay, not to you. It may be frustrating to hear that you

still have work ahead of you, but taking feedback seriously will make your essay stronger.


Pay attention to ideas that contradict your own.

If comments show that a reviewer doesn't understand what you're trying to do, don't be defensive. Instead, consider why your reader is confused and figure out how to clarify your point. Responding to readers' objections — instead of dismissing them — will strengthen your ideas and make your essay more persuasive.


Look for global concerns.

Your reviewers will probably make more suggestions than you can use. To keep things

manageable, focus on the comments that relate to your thesis, organization, and evidence.

Do your readers understand your main idea? Can they follow your train of thought? Are they looking for more supporting ideas or facts?


Weigh feedback carefully.

As you begin revising, you may find yourself sorting through comments and suggestions from many people, including instructors, writing tutors, and peer reviewers. Sometimes these different readers will be in agreement, but often their advice will differ greatly. It's important to carefully sort through all of the comments you receive with your original goals in mind —
otherwise you'll find yourself with the nearly impossible task of trying to incorporate everyone's advice.


Keep a revision and editing log.

Make a clear and simple list of the global and sentence-level concerns that keep coming up from most of your reviewers. Such a list can serve as a starting point each time you revise a paper. When you take charge of your own writing in this way, comments will become a valuable resource rather than something to dread.


Copyright © 2006 by Bedford/St. Martin's dianahacker.com/writersref

Adapted from
The Bedford Handbook
Seventh Edition

Tuesday, October 14, 2008

Day 16 Lab

Fall 08 English 101 Day 16


  • BP?
  • H/W: Rough Draft Due Wednesday 3-5 pages. 5 copies.

Before we start:

Intro, Body Paragraph One—Scout at the start (a quote would really help here).

Final body paragraph, Conclusion—Scout at the end (another quote, related to first would clinch it).

Now:

  • Write. Put the same kind of pressure on yourself as before.
  • Dig in the book.
  • Ask me questions.
  • Try these links:

Big Read

Sparknotes

eNotes

Grade saver (good on quotes)

LOTS more quotes from the novel

Monday, October 13, 2008

Day 15

Fall 08 English 101 Day 15

  • BP?
  • H/W: Rough Draft Due Wednesday 3-5 pages. 5 copies.

Essay Topic

By the end TKAM, what are Scout's values and how did she arrive at them? How do her values reflect the values of Maycomb? What did she pick and choose?

Thursday we narrowed our topic down to specific values:

Race, gender, class etc.

Then we divided the values into the subcultures with differing points of view.

(Ex: Gender: Traditional Femininity / Feminist, free-spirits, individuals)

Next we asked:

Who are the spokespeople for these subcultures?

Then we sketched a tentative outline.

Friday we started looking for evidence.

Today:

Let's try another kind of outline: Mapping.

How to integrate (weave in) the evidence?

MLA requires

  1. In text
  2. Works Cited
    1. Let's look at Hacker first.

Then my notes.

Friday, October 10, 2008

Day 14

Fall 08 English 101 Day 14

BP? BP this weekend: Bird Walk, Gospel Choir.

  • H/W: Finish TKAM

Essay Topic

What are the cultural values of Maycomb?

By the end TKAM, what are Scout's values and how did she arrive at them? How do her values reflect the values of Maycomb? What did she pick and choose?

Yesterday we narrowed our topic down to specific values:

Race

Gender

Class

Religion

Justice


Then we divided the values into the subcultures with differing points of view.

(Ex: Race: Traditional Femininity / Feminist, free-spirits, individuals)

Next we asked:

Who are the spokespeople for these subcultures?

Then we sketch a tentative outline.

Today:

GO TO THE BOOK. This is the heavy lifting. (Although Amazon & Google make it easier).

Choose a topic that interests you. Find a connection. It does not need to be a direct connection. In fact, that's one of the points of the book.

You might care about race because of a friend. You might care about gender because of your sister. Maybe you care about the religious issues because you love your garden or you wash your feet.

Then, we'll work apart for half an hour. Find the evidence.

Keep a list of page numbers with notes on what the quote is.


Finally, we'll group up to share our research.

To Kill a Mockingbird in the News

Why the Mob Mentality has Republicans and Democrats worried.

Boo, Tom and Barack:

Here , here, and here.

Thursday, October 9, 2008

Implicit Association Test

Here's an interesting test you can take to see if you have any hidden gender/racial biases.

I'll tell you my results later.

Here's a whole bunch more from Harvard.

Day 13

Fall 08 English 101 Day 13


  • BP?
  • H/W: TKAM chapters 26/27

830 & 930 Quiz TKAM

1130 Study Guides then Quiz

Correct Quiz

Essay Topic

What are the cultural values of Maycomb?


By the end TKAM, what are Scout's values and how did she arrive at them? How do her values reflect the values of Maycomb? What did she pick and choose?


What are the broad categories?


Race

Gender

Justice

Religion

Class


Can we divide the categories easily? What sides/subcultures are there?


Who are the spokespeople/subcultures for those values?


Ok. Now. An outline. A thesis?


Next, GO TO THE BOOK. This is the best return on your time possible.


It will make your thesis better.

It will make your ideas more credible.

It will save you time when you come to write it.

You will get more dates and have fuller thicker shiny hair.


But it takes time. This is the heavy lifting.


You can help yourself by annotating in the book and by taking notes during class. If you're reading well, you can remember where it is in the book sometimes down to the exact position on the page.


You can find some of it on the storyboard.


You can also try sparknotes to help you get to the right spot quicker.

Wednesday, October 8, 2008

Day 12

Fall 08 English 101 Day 12


 

  • Library BP?
  • BP: Poetry Reading Allied Arts Wednesday 7pm.
  • H/W: TKAM chapters 24/25 (quiz 12-25 Thursday)

Today:

8 groups

Chapters 14/21    15/20    16/19    17/18

For each:

  • Chapter Title
  • Significant Image/Symbol
  • Significant quote with page numbers

Study Guide H/O and work on if there's time.

Study Guide 2

Mockingbird Short Answer Study Questions


 

Chapters 12-14


 

  1. How does Jem change?


     


     

  2. What does Scout learn about Calpurnia?


     


     

  3. Who was waiting for the children when they came home from the church service? Why

had she come?


 

4. "Aunt Alexandra fitted into the world of Maycomb like a hand in a glove, but never into the

world of Jem and me." Explain.


 


 

5. Atticus and Alexandra disagree about how to deal with the children. How does Atticus

handle the situation?


 


 

6. Describe Jem and Scout's relationship through these chapters as Jem matures.


 


 

7. Why did Dill run away from home back to Maycomb?


 


 

Chapters 15-17


 

  1. What did Mr. Heck Tate's mob want?


     


     

  2. What was the purpose of Walter Cunningham's mob?


     


     

  3. Why did Mr. Cunningham's mob leave?


     


     

  4. Identify Mr. Dolphus Raymond.


     


     

5. What was the importance of Mayella's bruises being primarily on the right-hand side of

her face?


 


 


 

Chapters 18-21


 


 

  1. What was Tom's handicap? Why was it important to his case?


     


     

  2. What do Dill and Scout learn from Mr. Raymond?


     


     

  3. Summarize Atticus' closing remarks to the jury.


     


     

  4. What was the jury's verdict?


     


     

Chapters 22-25


 

  1. Why did Jem cry?


     


     

  2. What was "'round the back steps" when Calpurnia came in on Monday morning?


     


     

  3. What was the significance of Maudie's two little cakes and one large one?


     


     

  4. Describe Bob Ewell's meeting with Atticus at the post office.


     


     

  5. What is Atticus' reaction to Ewell's threats?


     


     

  6. Alexandra doesn't want Scout playing with Walter Cunningham. Why not?


     


     

7. Jem said. "I think I'm beginning to understand why Boo Radley's stayed shut up in the

house all this time . . . it's because he wants to stay inside." Why does he say that?

Tuesday, October 7, 2008

Day 11

Fall 08 English 101 Day 11


  • Library BP?
  • BP: Poetry Reading Allied Arts Wednesday 7pm.
  • H/W: TKAM chapters 22/23 (quiz 12-25 Thurday)

Today:

8 groups

Chapters

14/21

15/20

16/19

17/18

For each:

  • Chapter Title
  • Significant Image/Symbol

Significant quote with page numbers

Friday, October 3, 2008

Day 10

Fall 08 English 101 Day 10


 

  • No class Monday
  • Library BP?
  • H/W: TKAM chapters 14-21 (This weekend will be a big test for you)
  • Essay 2 Topic
  • Setting of Maycomb, so far

Setting Notes

  1. Time


 

  1. Place (physical environment)
    1. Country
    2. State
    3. City
    4. Landscape
    5. Climate
    6. House
    7. Yard/Surroundings


       

Cultural Values H/O Read


 

Freewriting

  1. How does Maycomb handle "a group member (that) expresses a value that is in serious conflict with the group's norms"? How does Maycomb "encourage conformity"?
  2. What people receive "honor or respect" in Maycomb? What are they being valued for?
  3. What are the CULTURAL values (ideals, standards, morals, principles, customs, mores) of Maycomb?
    1. Good ones?
    2. Negative ones?
  4. What are the values regarding
    1. Gender (male/female)
    2. Race
    3. Justice
    4. Tolerance
  5. What values are in conflict in Maycomb?
  6. What is the Real culture in Maycomb?

What is the Ideal culture in Maycomb?

Essay 2 Topic

Essay 2: The Cultural Values of Maycomb


 

Rough Draft Due: October 15th

Final Draft Due: October 20th

3-5 pages, double spaced


 

  • What are the cultural values of Maycomb?


 

  • As she moves from childhood to maturity, what are the cultural values Scout learns to "synthesize and extract" from the "multiple subcultures" she belongs to? What values has she adopted and what values has she rejected?


 

  • In other words, by the end TKAM, what are Scout's values and how did she arrive at them?


     

Background:

According to Wikipedia:

Members take part in a culture even if each member's personal values do not entirely agree with some of the normative values sanctioned in the culture. This reflects an individual's ability to synthesize and extract aspects valuable to them from the multiple subcultures they belong to.

To consider:

  1. How does Maycomb handle "a group member (that) expresses a value that is in serious conflict with the group's norms"? How does Maycomb "encourage conformity"?
  2. What people receive "honor or respect" in Maycomb? What are they being valued for?
  3. What are the values regarding
    1. Gender (male/female)
    2. Race
    3. Justice
    4. Tolerance
  4. What values are in conflict in Maycomb?
  5. What is the Real culture in Maycomb?

What is the Ideal culture in Maycomb?

Thursday, October 2, 2008

Day 9

Fall 08 English 101 Day 9

  • Library BP?
  • H/W: TKAM chapters 12-13
  • Study Guide JigSaw
  • Quiz
  • Setting of Maycomb, so far

Setting Notes

  1. Time
  2. Place (physical environment)
    1. Country
    2. State
    3. City
    4. Landscape
    5. Climate
    6. House
    7. Yard/Surroundings

Cultural Values H/O Read

Freewriting

  1. How does Maycomb handle "a group member (that) expresses a value that is in serious conflict with the group's norms"? How does Maycomb "encourage conformity"?
  2. What people receive "honor or respect" in Maycomb? What are they being valued for?
  3. What are the CULTURAL values (ideals, standards, morals, principles, customs, mores) of Maycomb?
    1. Good ones?
    2. Negative ones?
  4. What are the values regarding
    1. Gender (male/female)
    2. Race
    3. Justice
    4. Tolerance
  5. What values are in conflict in Maycomb?
  6. What is the Real culture in Maycomb?

What is the Ideal culture in Maycomb?

Wednesday, October 1, 2008

Day 8

Fall 08 English 101 Day 8


 

  • Library BP?
  • Study Guide JigSaw
  • Homework 10/11 TKAM
  • Quiz Tomorrow over 1-11
  • Friday- Setting of Maycomb, so far

Setting Notes

  1. Time


 

  1. Place (physical environment)
    1. Country
    2. State
    3. City
    4. Landscape
    5. Climate
    6. House

Yard/Surroundings

Tuesday, September 30, 2008

Day 7

Fall 08 English 101 Day 7

  • Library BP? Handout
  • All essays returned in about a week.
  • Homework Chapter 9 (Quiz Thursday over 1-11)
  • Study Guide Homework. Count by 3's Due BOP tomorrow.
  • Characterization
    • What they say, do, look like, think
    • What others say about them
    • Names

Plot:

The chain of events.


Basic Conflict—sometimes called the Dramatic Situation:

The problem that starts a story in motion.

It usually describes both a protagonist's motivation and the forces that oppose its realization. Often expressed as Man v. Man; Man v. Nature; Man v. Society; Man v. Machine; Man v. Self


Exposition:

The opening part of a story.

The scene is set, the protagonist is introduced and the author gives background information.

Complication:

First twist


The introduction of a significant development in the central conflict in a story. Traditionally, a complication begins the

Rising Action of a story's plot.

Flashback:

A scene relived in a character's memory.

Crisis:

The big turning point.

It's when the crucial action, decision, or realization must be made, marking the turning point of the protagonist's fortunes. It is the start of the Falling Action.

Climax:

The moment of greatest intensity in a story, which almost inevitably occurs toward the end of the work.


Resolution/Denouement:

The final part of the story, the concluding actions that follow the climax.

Sometimes the conclusion is unclear (ambiguous) on purpose.

Setting Notes
Time

    1. Year
    2. Season
    3. Month
    4. Day of Week
    5. Time of Day
    6. General Era


Place (physical environment)

    1. Country
    2. State
    3. City
    4. Landscape
    5. Climate
    6. House
    7. Yard/Surroundings

Monday, September 29, 2008

Day 6

Fall 08 English 101 Day 6

  1. TKAM Kickoff?
  2. All essays returned in about a week. So far, lots of 16/20's.
  3. Quiz Names/Faces
  4. Characters so far
    1. Scout
    2. Atticus
    3. Jem
    4. Calpurnia
    5. Boo Radley
    6. Dill (Charles Baker Harris)
    7. Miss Caroline Fisher
  5. Homework Chapter 8 (Quiz Thursday over 1-11)
  6. Further Upcoming Bonus Points: BIG READ CALENDAR HERE
    1. Bird watching 10/11
    2. Book discussion 10/14 (Selah)
    3. Information Literacy (Only: Research Information Sources/ Topic and Thesis, Proquest, Web Evaluation, Plagiarism)
  7. Tomorrow:
    1. Plot so far
    2. Exposition and Setting: Maycomb

Friday, September 26, 2008

Day 5

Fall 08 English 101 Day 5

  1. What are small town values? Define the term, using examples to support your point or points.
  2. Keep an eye on the clock.
  3. Go.
  4. Homework: Read through Chapter 7 in TKAM
  5. Names quiz on Monday.

Thursday, September 25, 2008

Day 4

Fall 08 English 101 Day 4

  1. Names, Quiz Monday.
  2. Friday meet in C210 (Deccio 2nd floor)
  3. Three things in a paragraph.

    1. Three things in an essay. (This is repeated in Hacker C4)
  4. Three things before you write. (There's a good checklist on C1-b in Hacker)
  5. Three things to consider when making your point.
  6. The Writing Process

    1. Three Things plus, one more.

      1. Planning

        1. Hacker, Exploring ideas
      2. Drafting
      3. Revising
      4. Publishing/Presenting

In Class Essay: What are Small Town Values?

How to prepare for and take an in class essay: Short Link, Longer Link

How to prepare for THIS in class essay

  • Do some Exploring of the Idea before coming to class. Try synonyms/antonyms
  • Notes/Outline (See Hacker C1-d page 12)
  • Typed or not, double spaced
  • Not written before class.
  • C210, 50 minutes

A successful essay will have

  1. an intro with a hook/background and thesis
  2. body paragraphs that have clear topic sentences and secondary support (examples/evidence of your point)
  3. a concluding paragraph

The best essays will have

  1. an original thesis, not clich├ęs or obvious statements
  2. credible, logical and varied sources of support
  3. some sizzle (hook, conclusion, risky ideas)

Homework: Chapter 4 TKAM

  1. Three links in case you missed them:

    1. Definition essay
    2. Definition essay
    3. Definition essay sample
    4. One more can't hurt, from the hippies at Reed

Wednesday, September 24, 2008

Day 3

Fall 08 English 101 Day 3

  1. Questions for each other.
  2. Questions for me.
  3. Questions about the class.
  4. Names, Quiz Monday.
  5. Friday meet in C210 (Deccio 2nd floor)
  6. Three things in a paragraph.

    1. Three things in an essay.
  7. Three things before you write.
  8. Three things to consider when making your point.
  9. Three links to get you started:

    1. Definition essay
    2. Definition essay
    3. Definition essay sample
    4. One more can't hurt, from the hippies at Reed

Homework: Chapter 3 TKAM

Tuesday, September 23, 2008

Cell Phone Policy

Day 2

Fall 08 English 101 Day 2


 

  1. Video
    1. Assignment for Friday in class essay:
      1. What are small town values? Give examples/evidence to support your ideas.
      2. 20 points grande.
      3. The idea is to get a baseline.
      4. The idea is to improve, to progress.
  2. Assumptions
  3. Syllabus
    1. Attendance
    2. Late work
    3. Rubric
    4. Calendar
  4. Video
  5. Questions
  6. Homework: Read Ch 2 in TKAM
  7. Tomorrow
    1. Three things—paragraph/essay structure.
    2. Three things—sound argument.
  8. Thursday
    1. Prewriting/Preparing for in class essay.

Sunday, September 21, 2008

Syllabus

Yakima Valley Community College—English Composition 101

Glenn-Anthon Dan Peters, Instructor dpeters@yvcc.edu 574.6800.3194

Office Hours: 730-820 Fall 2008

Course Description:

In the first of two college-level courses, English 101, students will learn to write clear, unified, coherent, and well-developed essays of increasing complexity. These essays may be about literary and nonliterary texts, or they may rely upon such texts as points of departure for the discussion at hand. Through reading, writing, and discussion, students will learn to critically examine their own assumptions and opinions and to consider the facts and reasoning of others. When documenting sources in their essays, students will use the basic citation methods of the Modern Language Association. Students successfully completing English 101 should be adequately prepared to succeed in the second college-level composition course, English 102.

Prerequisites:
ASSET placement score: 46-54
Students who complete English 75 with a minimum grade of S or ESL 102 with a minimum grade of B+ are also eligible for English 101.

Course Outcomes:

Upon completion of the course, the student will be able to:

Course Objectives

01

Generate content from personal experience, readings, class discussion or other appropriate means

02

Write essays with a thesis or central idea and develop a narrative, descriptive, or analytical essay according to organizing principles

03

Use evidence to support assertions

04

Paraphrase, summarize, and quote accurately

05

Anticipate and respond to the needs of a reading audience

06

Practice MLA documentation conventions

07

Improve writing through revising, editing, and proofreading drafts

08

Respond to peer's writing and consider feedback from readers

09

Reflect on one's own writing process, strengths and weaknesses, and progress

10

Practice critical reading strategies

Abilities:

Students will have the opportunity to practice the following Abilities as they meet course objectives:

Analytical Reasoning (AR) and Communication (C).

Required Texts/Materials

  • A Writer's Reference, Hacker 6e
  • To Kill a Mockingbird, Lee
  • In Cold Blood, Capote
  • Three Ring Binder
  • Spiral bound notebook
  • A good college-level dictionary

Suggested: highlighter pens, mini-stapler, blue & black ink pens, thumb drive


Labs and Internet:

We will not have lab time on a regular basis.

There is a blog associated with this class: www.yvccenglish101.blogspot.com

This site is unofficial and updated when I can get to it. I'll try to post lesson plans, useful links and reading schedules, but you should not rely on this site for anything beyond supplementing your classroom experience. That being said, it will be a big part of this quarter in particular.

Required Work

  • 3-4 complete assignment sequences. Sequences will center on three related topics—

    Essay 1: What Are Small Town Values?

    Essay 2: What are the Values of Maycomb?

    Essay 3: Creative Response

    Essay 4: What do ICB and NCFOM say about Smal Town Values?

  • These sequences will include various prewriting activities, a rough draft and a second draft of all three essays.
  • Reading and commenting on students' papers. Your comments on papers should help others to revise and improve their work.
  • Readings as assigned.
  • Participation in class discussions and activities.
  • Preparation for class activities.
  • Quizzes on readings
  • A final revised essay for an improved score

Attendance Policy

If you miss 5 classes for any reason, you will lose one letter grade.

If you miss 10 classes you will lose two letter grades

If you miss 12 classes, you will be withdrawn from the course.

Coming 10 minutes late is absent. Leaving 10 minutes early is absent.

Please, come on time. Turn off the electronics. Lean in.

Requirements for essays and homework

All essays and homework are due on the date assigned.

Late work will not be accepted. Don't push me on this. It works for everybody. You will be given opportunities to make up these lost points through bonus point activities.

Essays are required to be between 3 complete pages and 5 pages long, double-spaced, in a normal sized (12 point) font or type comparable to Times New Roman. Essays not meeting the minimum length requirement, whether through failure to complete 3 pages, use of a larger than normal font, or crayon pictures of a house or a kitty, or large margins, will have a reduced grade. Failing to complete page 3 by a line or two won't affect your grade, but stopping your essay on the middle of page 3 certainly will. Works Cited pages, graphics, charts, etc. do not count toward the minimum page requirement.

All essays must be typed or printed on a computer printer.

Essays must be typed in MLA format: with your name and page number in the top right-hand corner. Double-spaced. Correct heading

  1. Keep a HARD COPY of your essay, so that you will have a back-up in case of loss, fire, flood, locust, jelly donuts, terrorists, disk crash, etc. Anyone working on computer should have a back-up copy of his/her essay on disk.

  2. Plagiarized work will be scored as a 0 and will not be eligible for revision/rescoring.

Grades

Your grade will be broken into two parts:

  1. The first will be for all the work you do prior to a second draft (D2).
    1. This work will account for 40% of your final grade.
    2. These assignments will either be assigned a point value (ex: 7/10) or be graded on a +, \, - basis.
  2. The second part of your grade is your first and second drafts.
    1. This work will account for the 60% of your final grade.
    2. These are essays that I will read, give comments on and score from 0-100.
    3. Rubrics will be distributed at a later date.
  3. The third part of your grade will be bonus points. Because of activities related to the Big Read, there will be a record number of bonus point opportunities this quarter.

Scale:

A= 93%

A-= 90

B+= 87

B= 83

C+= 77

C= 73

C-= 70

D= 60


Course Adaptation: If you need course adaptations or accommodations because of a disability, if you have emergency medical information to share, or if you need special arrangements in case the building must be evacuated, please talk with me as soon as possible.

Rubric Essay One

Ideas and Support

(AR—Supports claims with evidence) 40 points

Unacceptable

Developing

Acceptable

Proficient

The student's essay does not have a clear focus and includes little credible or relevant evidence.


0-27

The student's essay has a focus and offers some relevant supporting evidence, but also offers additional claims, evidence from questionable sources, and/or evidence of questionable relevance.

28-31

The student's essay has an identifiable claim; the student supports his or her claim with appropriate evidence that is generally relevant to that claim.

32-35

The student's essay has a unique, arguable claim; that claim is supported using appropriate, sufficient, and relevant evidence from credible and varied sources.


36-40

MLA Style

(AR—Applies discipline-specific conventions) 20 points

Unacceptable

Developing

Acceptable

Proficient

The student produces an essay that does not use MLA documentation appropriately (i.e. lacks in-text documentation or lacks a reference page; paraphrases border on plagiarism, etc.).

0-11

In the essay, the student includes sources information, but does not fully integrate them; the student demonstrates some understanding MLA documentation, but struggles to consistently and correctly apply it.


12-15

The student produces an essay in which sources consistently and accurately quoted or paraphrased and are cited (in-text and on Works Cited page) according to MLA format.

16-17

The student produces an essay that complies with discipline standards: the essay is formatted correctly; sources are integrated effectively and are properly quoted/paraphrased and cited in-text; Works Cited page is complete, accurate, and correctly formatted.

18-20

Standard Written English

(C — Uses contextually appropriate language and conventions; AR – Methods) 20 points

Unacceptable

Developing

Acceptable

Proficient

The student's essay includes many major errors—in grammar, syntax, and diction—that distort meaning and interrupt flow of reading.


0-11

The student's essay includes a number of distracting minor errors or some major errors that distort meaning, though overall meaning is not lost; at times, sentence structure disrupts flow, and word choices lack variety and precision.

12-15

The student's essay contains few distracting errors in syntax, diction, grammar, or mechanics, and the errors do not detract from the meaning;


16-17

The student's essay contains few or no noticeable errors in grammar or mechanics and errors do not distract reader; sentences fluency and word choice enhance the readability and "voice."


18-20

Organization

(C) 20 points

Unacceptable

Developing

Acceptable

Proficient

The writing lacks a clear sense of direction. Ideas, details or events seem strung together in a loose or random fashion; there is no identifiable internal structure. No real intro or conclusion.

Connections betw. ideas are confusing or missing

0-11

Problems make it hard for the reader to get a grip on the main point or story line. The paper has a recognizable intro and conclusion. The introduction may not create a strong sense of anticipation; the conclusion may not tie up all loose ends.

12-15

The organization structure is strong enough to move the reader through the text without too much confusion. Intro and conclusion grab reader's attention. Transitions often work well.



16-17

The organization enhances and showcases the central idea or theme. The order, structure, or presentation of information is compelling and moves the reader through the text. Organization flows so smoothly the reader hardly thinks about it.

18-20